In Case of Emergency

In case of emergency dial 911 or go to your nearest emergency room.  For poisonings, dial the Poison Control Center at (800) 222-1222.

Accidental Injury

By definition, an accidental injury is an injury that could have been prevented. While 100% of all home injuries cannot be prevented, many can. The Healthy Homes Coalition wants families to be safe in their homes.

 

What are the most common accidental injuries in the home?

All combined, burns and scalds, falls, and poisonings are responsible for 86% of home injury deaths. Drowning only comprise 3% of home deaths, and fire arms only 1%. All accidents are preventable.

Trips and falls are the leading cause of unintentional home injury and cause 43% of home injury deaths. Fires and burns are the third leading cause of accidental home injury and cause 9% of home injury deaths. But fire is not the only way children get burned. Bathing and kitchen related accidents are the most common causes of scalds and result in approximately 3,800 injuries each year.

Poisonings are the cause of 34% of home injury deaths, and are the result of not only chemicals kept in reach of children, but also carbon monoxide poisoning and misuse of medication.

Data from the National Center for Healthy Housing

Did You Know...

69% of homes with young children store household chemicals in unlocked areas.

Join the Healthy Homes Team! Job Openings.

Healthy Homes has a number of job openings. We will be hiring an Administrative Assistant to begin work July 1 or sooner. We are also taking resumes for a Public Relations position and a Community Organizing position, with projected start dates in July.  All positions are full time.

 


Healthy Homes Issues Lead In Water Report

The Healthy Homes Coalition partnered with the Environmental Defense Fund in 2016 to take a deep look into the safety of drinking water in Grand Rapids. Specifically, the groups were interested in knowing if street reconstruction including the replacement of water mains was posing any danger to the residents of Grand Rapids. In other cities, this kind of construction has been known to raise the content of lead in water above safe levels. Could the same be said of Grand Rapids


Michigan Legislature Considers Lead Appropriations and Policy

While much of the media coverage about the Flint water crisis has died down, there is much activity in Lansing in regards to childhood lead poisoning. Most notable at this time is the Governor's request for $2 million in funding for the newly formed Child Lead Exposure Elimination Commission. This request is working its way through the legislature, with the House and the Senate both offering different perspectives. There are also six bills that have been introduced to address lead exposure.