In Case of Emergency

In case of emergency dial 911 or go to your nearest emergency room.

Burns & Scalding

Bathing and kitchen related accidents are the most common causes of scalds and result in approximately 3,800 injuries each year.

 

The Source

Burns come from both open flames as well as hot surfaces, such as stove tops, pot and pans, hot radiators, exhaust flues, exposed light bulbs and more.

Scalds are also common and come from hot food and liquids. One of the most common causes of scalds, surprisingly, is hot water right out of the tap. While tap water may not seem  too hot to a typical adult, children and the elderly have much more sensitive skin and can be harmed when the tap water is above 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

Who is at Risk?

Children and the elderly are the most vulnerable to burns and scalds.

 

Health Impacts

Scalds and burns can kill. Burns and scalds cause 9% of home injury deaths.

 

Solutions

  • Check and adjust the temperature of hot tap water. The maximum heat should be set at 120 F.
  • Test children's bath water before placing them in the tub with simple bath thermometer.
  • While cooking on the stovetop, keep pot handles turned inwards.
  • Use oven mitts and potholders, and keep children away from the cook space.
  • Use caution while removing items from the microwave.
  • If you have radiators, install radiator covers.

 

Did You Know...

Hot water should be less than 120 degrees F to avoid risk of scalding.

Resources

Burns and Scald Prevention Tips(578 KB)

From Safe Kids Worldwide

Join the Healthy Homes Team! Job Openings.

Healthy Homes has a number of job openings. We will be hiring an Administrative Assistant to begin work July 1 or sooner. We are also taking resumes for a Public Relations position and a Community Organizing position, with projected start dates in July.  All positions are full time.

 


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