In Case of Emergency

If your carbon monoxide detector goes off, get everyone out of the house as soon as possible and call your local fire department from either your cell phone or a neighbors house.

Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of poisoning deaths in the United States.

 

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is an odorless and tasteless gas that can be given off during the burning of fuel.

 

The Source

Sources of this deadly gas in the home include furnaces, gas stoves and ovens, kerosene heaters, generators, vehicles and any other items that burn fuel. When these items malfunction or are used inappropriately, such as without adequate ventilation, they become dangerous.

Malfunctioning home furnaces cause up to 18.5% of all accidental poisonings by carbon monoxide in the United States.

 

Who is at Risk?

Anyone is susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning, although studies have shown that children are more susceptible to low levels of exposure.

 

Symptoms

If you have an unexplained headache, fatigue, dizziness or nausea, or if your carbon monoxide detector is going off, immediately evacuate your home and contact the fire department. Low-level carbon monoxide poisoning is often confused with cold and flu symptoms.

 

Health Impacts

Carbon monoxide starves the body of oxygen and can cause death in people of any age. For children, small doses of carbon monoxide over extended periods can also cause long-lasting health and developmental problems.

 

Solutions

The best protection is to have fuel burning appliances inspected annually and to install a carbon monoxide detector on each level of the home.

The Healthy Homes Coalition works with families with children to connect them with resources that can help provide a carbon monoxide detector for their home free of charge.  Resources to provide these free CO detectors are often limited.  Eligible families must have a resident child 14 years of age or younger and must live in the cities of Grand Rapids, Wyoming, or Kentwood Michigan. To see about getting a free detector for your home, contact the Healthy Homes Coalition.

 

Did You Know...

Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of accidental poisoning death in the U.S.

Resources

Carbon Monoxide Kills: More Than Half of Carbon Monoxide Poisonings Occur During the Winter Months(828 KB)

February 12, 2015 - Media alert on carbon monoxide poisoning in the winter months.

MEDIA ALERT: Exercise Caution When Using Generators During Power Outage(820 KB)

November 18, 2013 media alert regarding use of generators and risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

2013 Carbon Monoxide Report for the State of Michigan(617 KB)

2013 data on carbon monoxide deaths, hospitalizations, and poisonings for the state of Michigan provided by the Michigan Deaprtment of Health and Human Services (published March 2015).

Invisible Killer(152 KB)

Guide to Carbon Monoxide.

Carbon Monoxide Fact Sheet(1.5 MB)

Fact sheet jointly authored by the Healthy Homes Coalition and Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Injury Prevention Coalition (formerly the Safe Kids Coaltiion).

Join the Healthy Homes Team! Job Openings.

Healthy Homes has a number of job openings. We will be hiring an Administrative Assistant to begin work July 1 or sooner. We are also taking resumes for a Public Relations position and a Community Organizing position, with projected start dates in July.  All positions are full time.

 


Healthy Homes Issues Lead In Water Report

The Healthy Homes Coalition partnered with the Environmental Defense Fund in 2016 to take a deep look into the safety of drinking water in Grand Rapids. Specifically, the groups were interested in knowing if street reconstruction including the replacement of water mains was posing any danger to the residents of Grand Rapids. In other cities, this kind of construction has been known to raise the content of lead in water above safe levels. Could the same be said of Grand Rapids


Michigan Legislature Considers Lead Appropriations and Policy

While much of the media coverage about the Flint water crisis has died down, there is much activity in Lansing in regards to childhood lead poisoning. Most notable at this time is the Governor's request for $2 million in funding for the newly formed Child Lead Exposure Elimination Commission. This request is working its way through the legislature, with the House and the Senate both offering different perspectives. There are also six bills that have been introduced to address lead exposure.