Home Visits

The Healthy Homes Coalition employs three key strategies to eliminate harmful housing conditions to improve children's health and wellbeing: home visits, education and outreach, and advocacy for change. Below are descriptions of our home visiting programs.

Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids

Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids is a home visiting program designed to make children's housing healthier by providing home assessments and resources to parents. Through the program, community health educators provide in-home visits to low-income families with young children to help identify and address environmental health hazards in the home. The families are educated about the hazards found and then work with staff to create an action plan to eliminate those hazards. Activities are tailored to the family’s needs and may include teaching dust wipe sampling for lead, identifying and reducing asthma triggers, installation of smoke alarms or a carbon monoxide detector, radon testing, teaching lead-specific cleaning methods, and more.

Qualifications: The family must live in a pre-1978 home within the Grand Rapids metro area, have a child birth through age five in home, and be low to moderate income (≤80% of area median income).

 

Integrated Pest Management

Integrated pest management (IPM) uses an environmentally and family-friendly approach to eliminate roaches and rodents from homes without using toxic bombs or sprays. Healthy Homes works with families and teaches them simple strategies to eliminate pests and prevent them from coming back.

Qualifications: The family must have child with asthma or allergies in home, live in the Grand Rapids metro area, and be low to moderate income (≤80% of area median income).

 

Smoke Alarm/Carbon Monoxide Detector Installation.

As resources are available, the Healthy Homes Coalition provides FREE smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detector installations in the home.

Qualifications: The family must live in the cities of Grand Rapids, Kentwood or Wyoming and have a resident child under 14 years of age.

 

To participate in any of these services, contact the Healthy Homes Coalition.

 

Did You Know...

Most local housing codes require a smoke detector in every sleeping room.

Resources

IRS Form 990 (2015)(231 KB)

Federal tax form for the year ending June 30, 2015.

Making the Invisible Visible

What the Eyes Don't See is the title of Flint heroine Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha’s book about the Flint water crisis. It’s an appropriate title for a book where behind the scenes dealing resulted in thousands of children ingesting lead through their drinking water. However, it's also an accurate statement when it comes to children being poisoned by lead in communities like Grand Rapids that have long had safe drinking water.

We need to be able to see lead. The technology to measure lead in the environment has existed for decades.  This technology needs to be used to stop kids from hurting. Learn five specific ways to make invisible lead hazards visible.

 


Good Process + Great People = Healthy Kids

Did you know that the Healthy Homes Coalition is the number one source of referrals for the Get the Lead Out!  home repair program? It’s no surprise given the expert work of Jackie Hernandez, our Community Connections Coordinator.  

Executive Director Paul Haan will tell you it is Jackie Hernandez, our Community Connections Coordinator, is making it happen. “Jackie is unapologetic in her passion for helping kids and families succeed. Whether it’s her role as a Godfrey Lee school board member or her work at Healthy Homes, Jackie is 100% prepared to take action for her community!”


Healthy Homes in the News

Parents, a Healthy Homes Coalition board member, and staff were all featured on a Michigan Radio news story. We are sharing it here in case you missed it.

In the words of one of Healthy Homes’ newest board members, grandparent Lisa Matthews, "“People think (lead) is a small problem, but it’s a very big problem. I know it takes time to do something about it … I’m just sayin’ what are we going to do now?”

Healthy Homes is eager to begin working with the City and community partners to implement the solutions recommended in this report.