In Case of Emergency

If a child has severe symptoms of lead poisoning, such as vomiting or seizures, get immediate help by calling 911.  If a child is suspected of being exposed to lead, make an appointment with the child's health care provider or county health department to have a blood test done.

Fixing Lead Hazards

Most homes and apartments built before 1978 have lead-based paint. Making your units are lead-safe today, protects your investment long into the future. Lead-safe units are less likely to result in:

  • Local code-enforcement citations
  • Condemnation by the county for lead-based paint hazards
  • Prosecution under Michigan law for providing housing that poisons a child
  • Federal Title X infractions
  • Civil litigation by tenants with lead-poisoned children.

Families are increasingly seeking lead-safe units for their children. Offering lead-safe units with new windows and fresh paint makes your business competitive. Simply put, lead-safe housing makes good business sense!

The Grand Rapids community has numerous resources to help rental-property owners make and keep their income property lead-safe. The Healthy Homes Coalition recommends that landlords take the following three steps at all of their rental properties:

  1. Assess the property for lead hazards.
  2. Fix existing lead hazards.
  3. Implement a maintenance plan, using lead-safe work practices, that keeps properties in good repair.

 

Assessing Your Properties

The Healthy Homes Coalition recommends that landlords start by having their properties assessed for lead hazards. Only when you know where the hazards are can you take action to fix them. There are both moral and legal consequences when a child is poisoned in your home. Not knowing about lead is not a defense for the civil penalties that have been designed to protect children.

Healthy Homes recommends that landlords hire a third-party to get a combination Risk Assessment / Inspection report. This report will tell you where the lead-based paint is, whether it is in hazardous condition, and will make recommendations for appropriate yet cost-effective repair. The Michigan Department of Community Health provides a list of currently certified risk assessors and inspectors.

If you choose not to hire a third-party inspector, at the very least you should conduct a visual inspection at each of your properties twice a year. Be thorough, inspecting inside and out. Look for peeling and chipping paint. Watch for friction surfaces like windows and doors that are rubbing and creating lead dust. Make sure there is no bare soil around the home.

 

Fixing Lead Hazards

Making home repairs to fix lead hazards is a job best left to fully trained, state-licensed professionals. However, many landlords choose to make repairs on their own or to have them made by their maintenance staff or property management contractor. If you, your staff or your agents are considering making repairs, be sure to get training in lead-safe work practices. The federal Renovate Right rule administered by the US-EPA requires that all landlords doing work in that disturbs painted surfaces in pre-1978 housing be trained and certified. Not doping so could make you liable to costly fines and penalties.

If you are hiring general repairs that will disturb painted surfaces, be sure to compare at least three bids and ask the contractors is they are certified under the Renovate Right rule. If you are hiring contractors specifically to abate lead-based paint, consult the "Lead Removal" section of the yellow pages. Make sure you check each contractor's certification with the State of Michigan to ensure it is current. The Michigan Department of Community Health provides a list of currently certified contractors.

The primary sources for financing lead-hazard repair work for landlords in the City of Grand Rapids is the City of Grand Rapids' Get the Lead Out! Lead Hazard Control Program. This program offers landlords grants to make lead-hazard repairs. Eligible units must be in the City of Grand Rapids, be home to a child 0-5 years of age or vacant, and rented to a low-income family. For more information, contact the Healthy Homes Coalition.

 

Implementing a Maintenance Plan

Even after you make repairs, an annual visual inspection is still recommended. Paint fails. Some repairs come undone. Remodeling can expose hidden lead-based paint.

Schedule annual inspections and make sure you and/or your maintenance staff are fully trained in lead-safe work practices. Doing so will protect you and your investment.

 

Did You Know...

Lead-based paint, lead dust, and lead in the soil are the cause of nine out of ten childhood lead poisoning cases in Kent County, Michigan.

Resources

State of Michigan Certified Lead Inspectors(38 KB)

A list of State of Michigan Certified Lead Inspectors and Risk Assessors in the (616) area code as of 7/7/2016.

Join the Healthy Homes Team! Job Openings.

Healthy Homes has a number of job openings. We will be hiring an Administrative Assistant to begin work July 1 or sooner. We are also taking resumes for a Public Relations position and a Community Organizing position, with projected start dates in July.  All positions are full time.

 


Healthy Homes Issues Lead In Water Report

The Healthy Homes Coalition partnered with the Environmental Defense Fund in 2016 to take a deep look into the safety of drinking water in Grand Rapids. Specifically, the groups were interested in knowing if street reconstruction including the replacement of water mains was posing any danger to the residents of Grand Rapids. In other cities, this kind of construction has been known to raise the content of lead in water above safe levels. Could the same be said of Grand Rapids


Michigan Legislature Considers Lead Appropriations and Policy

While much of the media coverage about the Flint water crisis has died down, there is much activity in Lansing in regards to childhood lead poisoning. Most notable at this time is the Governor's request for $2 million in funding for the newly formed Child Lead Exposure Elimination Commission. This request is working its way through the legislature, with the House and the Senate both offering different perspectives. There are also six bills that have been introduced to address lead exposure.