Making the Invisible Visible

What the Eyes Don't See is the title of Flint heroine Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha’s book about the Flint water crisis. It’s an appropriate title for a book where behind the scenes dealing resulted in thousands of children ingesting lead through their drinking water. However, it's also an accurate statement when it comes to children being poisoned by lead in communities like Grand Rapids that have long had safe drinking water.

We need to be able to see lead. The technology to measure lead in the environment has existed for decades.  This technology needs to be used to stop kids from hurting. Learn five specific ways to make invisible lead hazards visible.

 


Good Process + Great People = Healthy Kids

Did you know that the Healthy Homes Coalition is the number one source of referrals for the Get the Lead Out!  home repair program? It’s no surprise given the expert work of Jackie Hernandez, our Community Connections Coordinator.  

Executive Director Paul Haan will tell you it is Jackie Hernandez, our Community Connections Coordinator, is making it happen. “Jackie is unapologetic in her passion for helping kids and families succeed. Whether it’s her role as a Godfrey Lee school board member or her work at Healthy Homes, Jackie is 100% prepared to take action for her community!”


Healthy Homes in the News

Parents, a Healthy Homes Coalition board member, and staff were all featured on a Michigan Radio news story. We are sharing it here in case you missed it.

In the words of one of Healthy Homes’ newest board members, grandparent Lisa Matthews, "“People think (lead) is a small problem, but it’s a very big problem. I know it takes time to do something about it … I’m just sayin’ what are we going to do now?”

Healthy Homes is eager to begin working with the City and community partners to implement the solutions recommended in this report.


Parents win BIG Victory!

On Thursday, April 25, the Kent County Board of Commissioners approved funding for two staff positions to investigate homes that are lead-poisoning children. Landlords who fail to act to be held accountable.


Thank You, Steelcase Foundation, for Lifting Parent Voices

We are fortunate to receive support from donors like the Steelcase Foundation. Last year, Healthy Homes was awarded a two-year grant to complete a project centered around lifting community voices.

Because of the Steelcase’s generosity, parents in the community have been able to make major strides in having their voices heard, and having a seat at the table.


Local Family Shares Their Positive Experience with Get The Lead Out Program

Javonte Tubbs, a lifelong Grand Rapidian, recently had repairs on his home completed by the Get the Lead Out program to get rid of lead hazards, and he would recommend to anyone considering it. 


Why Parent Voices Matter More

Two stories featuring parents who are fighting to end childhood lead poisoned were told in local news this past week.

These two stories represent the voices of parents whose children are directly affected by the threat of lead poisoning in the community. They are just two of thousands more in the city.


Keyon Lovett: Fighting Lead with Paint

Keyon Lovett didn’t mean to become a social activist. He just wanted to be an artist. Lovett’s work, currently displayed in our offices, connects the issues of the ongoing Flint water crisis, and the struggles lead affected families are dealing with in Grand Rapids.


Mayor Bliss Commits to Tackling Lead Aggressively

In her State of the City address on Thursday night, Mayor Rosalynn Bliss made it clear that fixing lead poisoning is a major priority for Grand Rapids.

"The recent increase in lead poisoning is a call to action," said Mayor Bliss. 

"Children should not only feel safe in our city. They must be safe. Especially in their own homes."


Persistence Pays Off for Healthy Homes, Kids

Momentum continues to build fast to solve the problem of children being exposed to lead in Grand Rapids – and to keep kids from hurting in our community. The culmination of two years of work is lining up across the city, county, and state – a change which will help families provide safe housing for their children.

Healthy Homes is leading the charge.


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