The Issues

The Healthy Homes Coalition takes a holistic, multi-issue approach to keeping children's housing safe. We work on asthma triggers like mold, moisture, and pests, indoor air quality issues like radon, carbon monoxide, and particulates, as well as lead poisoning and accidental injury.

 

Asthma

Asthma is the most common chronic health problem for children, and it is often triggered by conditions in the home. Asthma is a life-long disease that can only be managed, not cured. Symptoms and attacks can disappear for a period of time, but asthma does not.  It can flare up at any time. Common asthma triggers include dust, dander, cockroaches, mold, and air pollution.

 

Lead

Lead poisoning in children causes life-long brain damage, but is 100% preventable. Ninety percent of children lead poisoned in Kent County get the lead from dust in the home or soil in the yard as a result of lead-based paint and leaded gasoline.  Infants and toddlers have the highest risk of being lead poisoned, especially as they begin to move around the home on their own. There are no reliable symptoms for lead poisoning, so all at-risk children should get a blood test.

 

Mold & Moisture

Mold causes health problems and is a common trigger for allergies and asthma attacks. Mold can grows anywhere in the home with adequate moisture and food--but is easily managed by controlling moisture. Symptoms for people exposed to mold include sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, cough, postnasal drip, itchy nose, eyes or throat, and watery eyes.

 

Indoor Air Quality

The air we breathe directly effects our health.  Improving the air quality in the home helps children grow up healthy.

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Only smoking causes more lung cancer. There are no early symptoms of radon exposure and no easy way to test individuals for exposure. The best prevention is to test the home.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless and tasteless gas that is the result of burning of fuel. It is the leading cause of poisoning deaths in the United States. The solution is to keep fuel burning appliances maintained and a working carbon monoxide detector in the home.

A mixture of solid and liquid micro particles that usually consist of inorganic and organic chemicals, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, metals, acids, and semi-volatile compounds. These particles can come from a number of sources in the home including air fresheners, cleaning products, construction materials, plastics, beauty supplies and cosmetics, hobby supplies and more.

 

Pests

Pests can be more than just annoying; they can also be health hazards. Cockroaches, mice, and rats, in addition to the chemicals we use to control them, can contaminate the air in our homes and trigger asthma and allergy attacks.

 

Accidental Injury

All combined burns and scalds, falls, and poisonings are responsible for 86% of home injury deaths.  Drowning only comprise 3% of home deaths, and fire arms 1%.  All injuries are preventable.

Trips and falls are the leading cause of unintentional home injury. Fires are the third leading cause of accidental home injury. But fire is not the only way children get burned. Bathing and kitchen related accidents are the most common causes of scalds and result in approximately 3,800 injuries each year.

 

Did You Know...

There is a direct link between housing conditions and children's health.

Resources

A Guide to a Healthy Home(2.5 MB)

A guide from the Michigan Department of Community Health.

Let's Double-Down for Children with Asthma Like Louian

Little Louian's recently renovated home was in good condition, yet there were still things about the home environment that triggered Louian's asthma. Things had gotten so out of control that Louian ended up in the emergency room four times in a year. Healthy Homes provided Louian's mom with the knowledge, skills, and tools she needed to take action.

But this is just one of many families in need of support. Asthma attacks are the leading reason kids are going to Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital’s emergency room.  We need to do more to keep children like Louian from hurting, and we can with your help.


Healthy Housing Goes Global

​In November of 2018, the World Health Organization stepped firmly into the healthy housing world when it released its WHO Housing and Health Guidelines. While local conditions are different all over the world, the strategies WHO suggests are universal and certainly apply to Grand Rapids.


Alex Markham: Parent Leader and Super Volunteer

Here at Healthy Homes, we have a small, but mighty volunteer force. And, possibly no volunteer is more known around the offices as a go-to helper than Alex Markham. She has been a very regular giver of time, talent, and passion over the past three years, and we are thankful to have her as part of the team.